Breaking Down the Zestimate

When it comes to purchasing a new home, or selling the one in which you currently reside, the initial process can be confusing and overwhelming until you get the assistance of a good real estate professional.  So, it stands to reason that when beginning the process, buyers and sellers might do some preliminary research using a third-party site like Zillow.

Zillow is known for price estimates, both for buyers and renters, as well as providing limited community information for those who have never visited the neighborhood. On the outside, it seems like a handy resource when dipping a toe into the waters of real estate.  However, the property information and price estimates are often inaccurate, which can create major issues for buyers and sellers.  In other words, if you decide to use these big third-party websites, proceed with caution or forgo them altogether and get accurate data from a trusted, local real estate website and resource.

When you need assistance in your pursuit of the perfect home, there are several reasons to turn to an established agency with local knowledge and experienced real estate agents on its side. Otherwise, you may find yourself relying on the Zestimate, a computer-generated estimate that is not always the best measure of a home’s value.  Zillow knows this, and discloses this in small print on their site.

How is the Zestimate made?

As Zillow states, the Zestimate is meant only as an expression of the estimated market value, not an actual appraisal. The site is actually a computer program that automatically generates its report based on what is available to anyone: data and statistics that can be accessed with relative ease by the general public. As such, the program doesn’t take into account the additions you or its previous owner might have added while in residence. This can affect the Zestimate, putting the home at a lower or higher value depending on the extent of repairs or damage.

In Southeastern NC, we’ve seen Zestimates on some properties be off by as much as 45%.  For illustration purposes, evan a 15% margin of error on a $400,000 home results in a difference of $60,000 in value!  Further, the same algorithm to estimate the value of a home in a Detroit suburb is used to estimate the value of a home on the water in our region.  That’s pretty telling, isn’t it?

Even more telling is this article, which features information about the home of Zillow’s founder and CEO.  The day before his home sold for $1.05 million, the Zestimate for his property showed $1.75 million.  Need we say more?

How can your agency help clear the air?

When it comes time to sell or buy a home, don’t always trust that the Zestimate has given your house enough credit for what it’s worth.  Instead, broach the subject with a trusted real estate agent.  He or she can walk you through the criteria in further detail, help you get a professional appraisal and, for sellers, pull a list of comparable properties that have recently sold.  And while Zillow does have access to area information to prep you and your family for relocation, a local real estate agent has the insider knowledge that can never be replaced by statistics alone.

When it comes to your home, whether you’re buying or selling one, it’s important to have all the information available to you. With the help of well-established agencies like Intracoastal Realty, you can be sure you’ll have all you need to get settled. Contact us today to help you with the process!


Honoring Intracoastal Realty Veterans

To those in uniform currently serving, and to those who have served in the past, we honor you today and every day.  Thank you for your service to our country so that we can enjoy our freedoms.

Intracoastal Realty is a special “family” with people of many backgrounds and interests.  As we honor all Veterans on November 11th (federal holiday this year is November 10th), we would like to recognize agents and staff at Intracoastal Realty who have served our country.

Tracel Wilt, U.S. Army.  Sales Agent at the Wilmington Lumina 1 office.  Tracel is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point.

 

Bob Caulder, U.S. Army. Sales Agent at the Ocean Isle Beach office.  Bob served 8 years (4 active and 4 inactive) and was stationed at Fort Dix, NJ for basic training; Fort Gordon, GA for AIT training; Fort Bragg, NC for compassionate reassignment; and Berlin, Germany, which earned him the Berlin Occupation Medal.  Bob was E-5 promotable who served in the Vietnam era.

 

Tom Adam, U.S. Army.  Manager at the Wilmington Lumina 1 office.  Tom served 3 years at various bases in the USA and also served in Korea.

 

Eddie Lawler, U.S. Navy.  Sales Agent at the Wilmington Lumina 1 office.  Eddie served for 4 years (1966-1969) on NAS Oceana VA85 in Virginia Beach; USS Kitty Hawk – VA85; USS America – VA85; and USS Constellation – VA85.  Eddie was AE2 Vietnam.

 

Chet Sechrest, U.S. Army.  Sales Agent at the Leland office.  Chet served for 27 years and 9 months at Hunter Army Airfield 1/75 Ranger Battalion; Ft. Devens, MA 10th Special Forces Group; Panzer Kaserne Germany; Ft Bragg 3rd Special Forces Group; and Ft Meade, MD Asymmetric Warfare Group.  Chet retired as Sergeant Major, has been to Iraq three times, and has been to 30 other countries around the world.

 

Hamilton Hicks, U.S. Marines.  Sales Agent at the Lumina 1 office.  “Ham” is a former mayor or Wilmington who served in USA, Japan, Okinawa, Taiwan, Philippines, and Vietnam waters.  Ham is a Retired Senior Officer.

 

Larry Sims, U.S. Marines.  Sales Agent at the Ocean Isle Beach office.  Larry served 5 years (1964-1968) and was stationed at Parris Island, Camp LeJeune, Norfolk, and Southeast Asia (Vietnam).  Larry was an E5 Sergeant.

 

Gus Franklin, U.S. Navy.  Sales Agent at the Wrightsville Beach office.  Gus served 5 years (1970-1974) and was stationed at Norfolk and Newport.  Gus ranked as a Lieutenant.

 

Seth Parmelee, U.S. Army.  Sales Agent at the Leland office.  Seth was stationed at Vilseck, Germany, FOB Scunion in Iraq, and Fort Hood.  Seth was a Specialist, Iraq OIF 2 04-05.

 

Ed Sullivan, U.S. Navy.  Sales Agent at the Wilmington Lumina 2 office.  Ed attended the US Naval Academy and served for 14 years (1982-1995).  He was stationed in Pensacola FL, Norfolk VA, and in Washington DC at the Pentagon – Bureau of Naval Personnel.  Ed was a Lieutenant, Navy Pilot in Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

 

Tim Knapp, U.S. Navy.  Maintenance and Housekeeping Manager at the Vacation Rentals division of Intracoastal Realty.

 

Jim O’Daniell, Sr, U.S. Air Force.  Sales Agent at the Porters Neck office.  Jim served 22 years (1954-1975) and was stationed in Iceland, India, Vietnam, Georgia, Florida, Colorado, New York, and North Carolina.  Jim’s rank was Chief Master Sergeant E-9, Vietnam, 1965-1966, Hq. First Air Force: 1966-1969, Hq. Air Defense Command: 1970-1973.  He was the youngest Tech Sergeant E-6 in the United States Air Force 1959. Retired USAF 1975 at Ft. Fisher AFS NC.

 

Jeff Whitfield, U.S. Navy.  Sales Agent at the Wilmington Lumina 2 office.  Jeff was stationed in Virginia, Maine, Portugal, Spain, and Iceland and was attached to Patrol Squadron 44.

 

Jeff Broos, U.S. Air Force.  Sales Agent at the Wilmington Lumina 1 office.  Jeff served 7 years (1969-1975) and was stationed in Southern California and Southeast Asia.  Jeff was a pilot and Captain in the Vietnam War.

 

Debbi Snyder, U.S. Army.  Sales Agent in the Wilmington Lumina 2 office.  Debbi served 15 years (1986-2000) and was stationed at Fort Indiantown Gap PA, Fort Dix NJ, Fort Bragg NC, and Ashley PA Reserve Unit.   Debbi was a member of the University of Scranton ROTC, Military Police, and the US Army Corps of Engineers.

 

Harold Parker, U.S. Army.  Sales Agent in the WIlmington Lumina 1 office.  Harold was stationed at Fort Jackson SC (Basic Training) and Fort Meade MD (HDQ Detachment 68th Medical Group).  Harold was a Specialist 4th Class and attended Personnel Management School at Fort Benjamin in Indiana.  He also served as Administrative Support for training National Guard at Fort Indiantown Gap, PA and for the Army Reserve.

 


Throwback Photos

Chet Sechrest

 

Chet Sechrest (right) in fatigues

 

Tracel Wilt at West Point

 


Tortoise and Hare Invade Real Estate Market

By Jim Busby, Broker/REALTOR® with Intracoastal Realty

Reflecting on the trend in the market over the past 10 years, I am reminded of our old friend Aesop with his story of the Tortoise and the Hare. To lay the groundwork for this “fable-listic” tale let’s cite a few facts:

10 Years Ago – In July 2006, the value of homes in the US reached an all-time high driven by a combination of factors including irresponsible lending practices, speculative buying and “flipping” of houses for short-term profit, and good old-fashioned greed. This “too good to last” bubble burst shortly thereafter and on a national basis, the collective value of homes dropped by an average 27% over the ensuing 5 years. Along with this drop came a number of defaults and foreclosures, throwing the market into further disarray and severely impacting the net worth and lifestyle of many Americans while shattering the American Dream of home ownership. For my purposes, this time of the market represents the “Hare” portion of the story, with exciting but unsustainable activity.

Today – It was only recently – the first quarter of 2017 – when the value of homes recovered to the peak values of 2006. This recovery involved slow and steady progress driven by fundamentals including higher employment, low mortgage rates, a compelling opportunity to “buy vs. rent”, and an overall improving economic tide that “lifted all boats”. While not as frenetic – or perhaps as exciting — as the mid-2000s period, this most recent upturn in the market was “come by honestly”, and should be more sustainable and longer lasting, as our friend the Tortoise would have it.

Current View of Local Market – Although values are back to their all-time high, do not feel like you have missed out on the market. In fact, because things have settled into a more orderly trend, there is a reasonable expectation that you would be buying into a more rational and predictable market.

Pricing – As noted above, prices have recovered to previous highs, and in the most recent report on the local market from Cape Fear Realtors Association, the median price increased 4.44% over the past 12 months to $201,025. In terms of unit volume – or number of houses sold – the total of 1160 homes was a 10-year high. We are officially in a “seller’s market” which means there are more people on the buyer’s side than on the seller’s side. According to the basic law of supply and demand, this has started forcing prices higher as buyers compete for a limited number of houses. As part of this equation, the supply of homes in New Hanover County has dropped from a 5.1 month supply in February 2016 to 3.69 months in February 2017. We generally look at a 4-5 month supply as providing a balanced market between buyers and sellers. A related statistic is “days on market” or DOM for a listed house before it sells, which decreases as an active market competes for limited inventory. This figure decreased from 109 DOM in February 2016 to 94 DOM in February 2017.

Interest Rates – Despite several up-ticks in the past year, interest rates are still near historical lows making home ownership very affordable. As of this writing on May 3rd, the 30 year conventional rate was 4.17% which should be a strong “call to action” for anyone still sitting on the fencepost on a purchase decision.

 

Jim Busby  |  Email: jbusby@intracoastalrealty.com  |  Phone: 910-443-3992


Wilmington Facts from the Historian Bob Jenkins

The Gift of HistoryWalking tour - 1

On January 19th, area historian and Downtown Wilmington tour guide, Bob Jenkins shared with Intracoastal agents many interesting facts from Wilmington’s History.  From the early beginnings through current day, Bob delivered his key storytelling notes with humor and incredible detail. We tried to capture the essence in the highlights below. Pick out just a few to have on hand – you’ll be glad you did.

  • There are 320 miles of coastline in North Carolina – and the only main river feeding from the north of the state to the ocean is the Cape Fear River. The river is over 200 miles long!
  • The first 170 miles drop in elevation by 160 feet – delivering huge amounts of water down to where it meets the last thirty miles of water heading to the ocean – this last thirty-mile leg is tidal water.
  • While many river settlements along the east coast developed in the late 1600’s, the settlement of Wilmington was a late-developer. Even with all the great resources to be had (rice and timber), there was something to “fear” about the Wilmington location.
  • The term “Cape Fear” evolved due to the continual shifting of sands and navigable bottom changes presented by “Frying Pan Shoals” at the base of the river’s delta.
  • Only when the British desired another deep-water port along the coast between the Chesapeake Bay Settlement, and the Charleston, South Carolina, settlement (both were founded in the late 1600’s) was it worth the risk of the shoals to establish Wilmington.
  • The area around the river was ripe with opportunity for two key agricultural offerings – RICE and TIMBER.
  • The settlement of Brunswick Town was the first in our area to founded in 1726. British landowners originally from South Carolina, Maurice, and Roger Moore, established the first rice plantation. ORTON Plantation. The manor house was constructed in 1735.
  • There were approximately 120 RICE plantations along the river – not cotton as some would expect.
  • “Cape Fear Pines” were an available and grand crop for harvesting and for the production of turpentine and pine tar. Both became a huge resource as export items to the British in England. The pine trees were “boxed” to capture the natural pine-oil from them. Similar to capturing sap from maple trees in New England to make syrup.
  • Heart-Pine was treasured as the hardest wood for the keels of British ships, and Pine Tar kept the ships afloat – thanks to coating the bottoms of ships. Pine tar was plentiful and gooey; hence, the TARHEEL moniker given to North Carolinians, by locals and British Colonists.
  • In colonial times sixty-percent of all naval stores in England came from the Cape Fear region. Rice production was huge! One acre of ground could supply 75 bushels or rice, annually: hence, the term Carolina Gold.
  • The Port of Wilmington was developed by a Scot – John Martin – as he was given a land grant to focus on the development of a major seaport vs. agriculture.
  • The choice of the name “Wilmington” was bestowed on the town in honor of the Earl of Wilmington, Spencer Compton, a patron of the then current governor of North Carolina, Gabriel Johnston – and chartered in 1740.
  • The Cotton Exchange became the largest exchange in the World. In the 1870’s. It grew from agents of the company traveling to cotton farms in the area – and providing incentives for the southern farmers to work in partnership. The business included some fifty European agencies.
  • Over time – Wilmington became a major shipbuilding port and produced 243 “Liberty Ships” during World War II. There were five major railroads coming into and out of Wilmington due to the industry and the war economy. They started leaving in 1950.
  • Side Note – Masonboro Sound got its name from the Grand Masons (Masonic Lodge of the era).

 

Bob Jenkins Reference Resources:

www.shipwreckcharts.com
Cape Fear & Frying Pan Shoals
Cape Hatteras and Outer Banks

Harpers Weekly 1876 – turpentine production graphic and more!


Celebrate the Arts in January with AIW (Arts In Wilmington)

Saturday, January 28th at 6 pm, join AIW (Arts In Wilmington) for the first annual Wilmington Awards show at theArtWorks. This year’s celebration will honor four outstanding recipients from the area. Beer, wine, and heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served. 12-20-aiw-awards-promotion-poster-final

Award recipients include:
Individual Artist:  Hiroshi Sueyoshi
Individual:  Jim & Betsy Knowles, Owners of theArtWorks
Arts in Education:  Gabriel Lovejoy
Organization:  DREAMS of Wilmington

AIW (Arts In Wilmington) connects artists, arts professionals, and arts advocates and includes Wilmington, Carolina & Kure Beaches, Wrightsville Beach, Hampstead, Surf City, Topsail Beach, Burgaw, Leland, Shallotte, Southport and Brunswick County Beaches.

To purchase tickets:  AIWAwards.EventBrite.com

For more information:  Contact Craig Stinson at 910-524-2679 or craigstinson@intracoastalrealty.com

 


Charitable Giving: Intracoastal Realty Gives Back

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Each year, we award education scholarships to deserving students at Brunswick Community College, Cape Fear Community College, and UNCW (25 years & Counting! )

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Intracoastal Realty has a rich involvement with many charitable organizations through its managers, agents and staff members, to serve our community by way of helping others. Including:

ACCESS of Wilmington
Airlie Gardens
American Cancer Society
American Heart Association
American Legion
American Red Cross
Alzheimer’s Association
Arts Council of Wilmington
Art in Wilmington
Ashley Eagles Athletic Booster
Azalea Festival
Beach2Battleship Triatholon
Bellamy Mansion Museum Boys & Girls Club of Coastal Carolina
Brunswick Community College
Cameron Art Museum
Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club
Cape Fear Community College
Cape Fear Community College Foundation
Cape Fear Council- Boy Scouts
Cape Fear Habitat for HumanityCape Fear Home Builders Parade of Homes
Cape Fear Jazz Society
Cape Fear Literacy Council
Cape Fear Museum
Cape Fear Rugby Club
Cape Fear Surfrider Foundation
Carolina Canines for Service
Carousel Center
Center for the Visually Impaired
Children’s Museum of Wilmington
Chi Omega’s 11th Annual Golf Tournament Coastal Christian High School
Coastal Horizons Center
Committee of 100: WID
Communities in Schools of Cape Fear Community Boys & Girls Club
Community United Effort
Cucalorus – 2016 Supporting Sponsorship
DARE
Disability Resource Center
Domestic Violence Shelter DREAMS of Wilmington
East Coast Got-Em-On Classic
ELEMENT PRODUCTIONS

Family Services of the Lower Cape Fear
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
Girl Scout Troop 957
Girls Leadership Academy of Wilmington
Good Shepherd Center
Greater Wilmington Chamber of Commerce
Greater Wilmington Sports Hall
Guardian Ad Litem
Hanover Lions Club
Historic Wilmington Foundation
Hoggard Athletics & Theatre Departments JC Rowe, PK
JDRF- Hope Gala, FUND A CURE
Junior Achievement Spring Classic
Karma Foundation
Kids Making It, Inc.
Landfall Foundation
Leland Area Rotary Club – L.A. Golf Classic
Leukemia & Lymphoma Regatta Cup
Lower Cape Fear Historical Society
Lower Cape Fear Hospice & LifeCareCenter
Lump To Laughter, Inc.
Make-A-Wish Foundation
March of Dimes
Masonboro Island Preservation
Morris Animal Foundation
New Hanover County Schools
New Hanover Partnership
New Hanover Regional Medical Foundation
NC Association of the Deaf
NC Holiday Flotilla
North Carolina Coastal Land Trust
Oak Island Lions Club
Paws4People, Inc
Phoenix Employment Services Luncheon
Pleasure Island Chamber of Commerce
Pleasure Island Soccer Association
Port City Soccer Club
Relay for Life
Reel Housewives of Topsail Island
Rotary of South Brunswick
SMART START of New Hanover County
Snipes Elementary
Special Olympics Annual Fund
Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber
of Commerce
St. Marks Odyssey of the Mind Challenge
Supper Optimist Club Wilmington
Trinity Children Incorporated
University of NC at Wilmington
USO North Carolina, Inc – Golf Tournamnet
Welcome Home Angel
Whisper Foundation
Willie Stargell Foundation
Wilmington Central Rotary Club
Wilmington Housing Authority
Wilmington Women’s Club
Wilmington Realtors Foundation
Wrightsville Beach Fire Department
Wrightsville Beach Foundation
Wrightsville Beach Museum – 20th Lumina
Wrightsville Beach Police Officer’s Ball
Wrightsville United Methodist Church
YWCA of the Lower Cape Fear


Thursday Update: Properties Under Contract through 5/19/2016

Written:  $12,793,425  Units: 43
Closed:    $10,334,120  Units: 30
Listings:   $11,699,950  Units: 31

Under Contract

Selling Agent Listing Agent Property Address Town List Price 
Co-Broke Mary Kruszon 7104 Springer Road Wilmington $194,500
Co-Broke Gwen Hawley 261 Windchime Way Leland $169,900
Co-Broke Shirley James 304 Wilson Avenue Carolina Beach $140,000
Jeanne Campbell Co-Broke 4586 Exuma Lane Wilmington $144,900
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 4629 Laver Drive Wilmington $339,900
Paula Perkins Co-Broke 921 Chari Road Castle Hayne $249,000
Co-Broke Buzzy Northen 517 Beach Road North Wilmington $737,777
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 440 Newcastleton Drive Wilmington $329,000
Co-Broke Ashley Garner 909 Litchfield Way #A Wilmington $100,000
Melony Rice Co-Broke L 59 S 2 Ext 1 BSL Plat G/104 Southport $6,225
Co-Broke Angie Pool 200 Inland Greens Circle Wilmington $189,000
Angie Pool Co-Broke 1516  Black Chestnut Drive Wilmington $729,000
Co-Broke Jimmy Hopkins 269 Avendale Drive Rocky Point $245,000
Keith Beatty Michelle Clark 3 W Henderson Street #B Wrightsville Beach $549,900
Co-Broke Joyce Nunes 1101 Lakebreeze Court Leland $349,900
Co-Broke Lisa Wayne 7323 Cassimir Place Wilmington $172,000
Keith Beatty Keith Beatty 117 Dragonfly Court Wallace $299,900
Angie Pool Co-Broke 4130 Breezewood Drive #204 Wilmington $117,900
Co-Broke Gwen Hawley 596 N Horsepen Road Harrells $299,000
Michelle Clark Co-Broke 103 Coral Drive Wrightsville Beach $899,000
Mark Bodford Co-Broke 100 Salisbury Street Wrightsville Beach $1,060,000
Keith Beatty Keith Beatty 5220 Woodscape Drive Wilmington $549,000
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 705 Nut Bush Court Wilmington $129,000
Co-Broke Eva Elmore 233 White Oak Drive Wilmington $268,500
Pierce Barden Co-Broke 4923 Oleander Drive Wilmington $135,000
Co-Broke Carla Lewis 4209 Purviance Court Wilmington $248,500
Co-Broke Angie Pool 508 N Green Meadows Drive Wilmington $209,400
Allison Ester Keith Beatty 1800 Eastwood Road #145 Wilmington $269,000
Robi Bennett Co-Broke 514 Carolina Beach Avenue N #3A Carolina Beach $264,900
Keith Beatty Co-Broke 1304 Smith Bay Circle E Wilmington $245,000
Keith Beatty Co-Broke 6809 Mayfaire Club Drive #208 Wilmington $325,000
Ashley Garner Co-Broke 4117 Breezewood Drive #203 Wilmington $126,000
Co-Broke Carla Lewis 944 Arboretum Drive Wilmington $198,900
Co-Broke Sarah Harris 46 Craven Street Ocean Isle Beach $489,000
Linda Register Co-Broke 30 Wilmington Street Ocean Isle Beach $429,000

REALTOR® Action Day 2016

REALTOR® Action Day is a day for fellow REALTORS® and WRAR Members to serve their community by participating in a number of events around town. This is a great opportunity to brighten our community, gather with co-workers to work together as a team while bring awareness to the impact REALTORS® make in the community.

Intracoastal Realty agents participated in REALTORS®Action Day 2016 today from 9 am until noon in a number of activities.

The following agents participated in the Lumps to Laughter event hosted by Intracoastal Realty at their corporate office in Lumina Station:

Sarah Burris
Sherri Ingle
Melisa Gallison
Sara Morris
Sonia Morris
Clare Kiley
Julie Pettee
Karen Boney
Sharon Pate-Batts
Jeff Hovis
Happy Clark
Jennifer Davis
Heather Archer
Jennifer Hensley
Jennifer Davis
Lenora Norris
Jane Dodd
Deb Hays

The following agents participated at the 2016 RAD Kure Beach event:

Gail Bailey
Joyce Barnwell
April Congleton
Alicia Devereaux
Becky Lothe
Cynthia Remahl

The following agents participated in the 2016 Wrightsville Beach event:

Keith Beatty
Barbara Biedenbach
Lisa Bisanar
Karen Boney
Jill Boring
Bill Boyer
Sam Crittenden
Walter Crouch, Jr.
Walter Crouch
David Eggleston, Sr.
Mary Ann Euverard
Bob Fannon
Gus Franklin
Linda Franklin
Phillip Galloway
Ashley Garner
Don Harris
Gwen Hawley
Amy Holcomb
Helen Sanders
Phillip Galloway
RP Holding
Devin Warren
Nan Weiss
Dan Willard
Tee Woodbury
Sounia Nejad Chaney
Trey Wallace
Jimmy Hopkins
Gene Ingle
Rachel Kastner
Shanon Kelly
Pam Kittredge
Laurie Leighton
Chris Livengood
Christina McInnis
Casey McKinney
Brenda Mitwol
Tricia Monteleone
Ellen Northen
Joyce Nunes
Drew Pittman
Terry Quinn
Helene Rexing
Maureen Robison
Elizabeth Schuett
Eddie Keith
Robin Summerlin
Diane Steelman
Keith Suttle
Ed Thear
Dianne Thistle
Buzzy Northen

 

Here is a list of the activities:

  • Mulching Flower Beds
  • Planting marsh grass on beachhead and debris pickup with the Carolina Beach State Park March Grass Crew
  • Planting sea oats at Carolina Beach
  • Raking and cleaning up Castle Hayne Park
  • Landscaping & Painting at the Community Boys and Girls Club
  • Playing bingo, serving ice cream and singing at the Davis Community Meet and Greet
  • Planting azaleas, spreading pine straw, and picking up pine cones at Hugh MacRae Park
  • Landscaping and planting at the Kure Beach Community Center
  • Muching landscape beds at Monterey Heights Park
  • Landscaping renovations and installations at New Hanover County Senior Resource Center
  • Cleaning up walking trails at New Hanover County Senior Resource Center Nature Trail
  • Building raised planter beds and seating areas and filling the beds with fresh soil at St. John’s Community Garden
  • Cleaning up debris at Topsail Beach
  • Mulching planter beds and tree rings at Veterans Park
  • Ogden Dog Park
  • Wrightsville Beach
  • Provide data entry and administrative assistance to Lump to Laughter, a non-profit breast cancer support group that provides financial assistance and support to those in need in our area. Hosted by Intracoastal Realty

Participation numbers were estimated at nearly 600 area REALTORS® from WRAR, and Intracoastal Realty agents participated in events across our area. Here is a map of some of the events from today, courtesy of WRAR.

Realtor Action Day 2016

Take a look at our gallery of Intracoastal Realty agents in action, giving back.


Agent Highlight: Craig Stinson: LIVE LOCAL, LIVE SMALL: Expanding the arts means expanding economic development

Recently, Encore Magazine did a feature on one of our agents, Craig Stinson:

ARTS MEETUP: Craig Stinson (far left) with the Thalian Association staff at a previous Arts in Wilmington meetup; the next one is Wed., Mar. 9 at Art in Bloom. Courtesy photo.

Craig Stinson smiles and gives a little head shake. We have been discussing his project, Arts In Wilmington, and veered into a conversation about what the arts can or can’t do to heal societal ills. It’s oddly refreshing to hear someone actually put forth the idea that one visit to an inner-city school by a dance troupe for a master class might not be the missing element in eliminating prejudice from the world. Maybe “ars gratia artis” (“art for art’s sake”) is the point.

But back to Craig Stinson.

He’s a quiet man with a big smile. More so, he seems genuinely interested in collaborative work and listens attentively to other people’s ideas. Stinson started Arts in Wilmington as a newsletter in February of 2014.

“I just thought it would be fun to send out a newsletter every week with arts events happening,” he says. “I literally had five people the first issue. Two were me, one was my wife,” he says with a smile. “I’m almost at 1,400 subscribers now—by word of mouth.”

So, is Stinson making a living from this? No, he sells real estate by day.

“I just want people to know about the broad spectrum of stuff happening in Pender, Brunswick and New Hanover countiesm” Stinson tells. “Wilmington has one of the best arts scenes for an area this size, and it’s all so community-driven, which I love.”

Stinson has embarked on an interesting journey back to home. He moved away a little over two decades ago and in the meantime worked in arts administration in Washington D.C. and South Carolina. He cites the museum studies concentration at George Washington University as the motivator for persuing his degree there. He also worked with The Smithsonian, The National Endowment for the Arts, the Library of Congress, The Alamo …

“Really?” I interrupt him. “The Alamo? Was your office in the fort?”

He nods and gives me a surprised look.

This segued to South Carolina where he worked as program director for eight years at the South Carolina Arts Commission. “But I wanted to be home—I always wanted to get back to Wilmington,” he explains.

Stinson popped up on my radar about the time he started the newsletter. He was working in the Cucalorus office and we seemed to orbit each other. Then he started organizing networking events with Arts in Wilmington.

“There’s a lot of activity in Wilmington,” he says. “People hear of each other but sometimes they don’t know each other. We started the meetups so people could make that happen.”

Stinson rotates the location of the meetups monthly. He has utilized Flytrap Brewery on 4th Street and TheatreNOW on 10th Street, as well as art galleries like Eclipse at Blue Moon on Racine Drive and Spectrum Art and Jewelry at The Forum.

“Every time we have people come who have said, ‘I’ve never been in here,’” he notes. “They meet the owners, artists, performers. I think a lot of getting people involved is giving them a reference for the amenities in town.” 

He says people then have a relationship with a venue and its location, including knowing where to park. It might sound minor, but it can actually be a pretty major hurdle for a business or venue.

About a month ago Stinson sent a notice seeking nominations for the first Arts in Wilmington Awards. My main inquiry for him was knowing how his newsletters and awards are any different from The Arts Council of WIlmington and New Hanover County. “I don’t give grants,” Stinson says. When Stinson decided to start the awards, rather than reinventing the wheel, he pretty much copied a model he has seen work: The South Carolina Arts Council’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Awards. “I want it to be as transparent as possible, [with judging that] has solid credentials behind it,” he explains.

Six categories will be covered in the awards: Arts in Education, Organization, Government, Business/Foundation, Individual, and Individual Artist. Stinson has tapped people from Mississippi, South Carolina, Florida, and DC to judge the nominations. “The plan is to have them reviewed by people outside of the area—who have really solid arts administration backgrounds and people who are not in Wilmington.”

Stinson is quick to point out the categories are open to interpretation. In “Government,” for example, a juror could be someone who is an elected official, or works in government or for a municipality. The “Individual” category presents questions about advocacy for arts, volunteering, fundraising, and arts administration. “They cast a wide net in very specific areas,” he notes.

Outside of joy of recognition for winning an award, Stinson says highlighting exceptional individuals and businesses leads to awareness beyond Wilmington. “Ultimately the arts serve as an ambassador for the town itself,” he says. “From my perspective, it’s an issue of awareness and recognition. [W]e’ve had a long history of community theatre and visual arts. Wilmington has always been an arts city.”

Stinson constantly hears from colleagues in other parts of the country who are surprised at how much happens in Wilmington. His job as a real estate agent makes him think about why people would move here. He says obvious reasons like climate and proximity to the beach and having a cool downtown are one. “But arts is one component of that,” he notes.As we veer toward a conversation about how to measure economic value of the arts in a community, Stinson surprises me again.

“Some people just know they can take classes or get involved in the theatre scene,” he says. “I think if you package the arts well, the economic implications become obvious. If you start from the economic issue of the arts, to me, it takes away from the intrinsic creative value and bravery that the arts engender They show bravery. People don’t understand how . . . intimidating it would be to get up onstage and put yourselves out there in front of people. That translates into all kinds of other aspects of people’s lives (be it starting businesses). You want to talk about economic development? Talk about people who stand on a stage or create a 2D or 3D piece of work, and put it out there for everybody.” 

Stinson says Wilmington could call itself the “live-theatre capital of the East Coast.” He’s right. We have five to seven shows playing any given weekend. “So when you have a concentration of arts or arts activity, it ends up being the vanguard of economic development, in the sense that restaurants and retail pop up around it,” he continues. “Thus, housing values go up and people take pride locally and really reinforces sense of place.”

Amen.

To nominate someone for an Arts in Wilmington Award, log onto www.artsinwilmington.com. The nomination deadline is April 29.

DETAILS:
Arts in Wilmington Meetup
Art in Bloom • 210 Princess Street
March 9, 5:30 p.m. • Free
First 10 people get Art in Bloom T-shirt


Thursday Update: Properties Under Contract through 02/25/2016

Written:  $16,027,963  Units:  55

Closed:    $9,085,448    Units:  24

Listings:   $9,391,850    Units:  41

Under Contracts
Selling Agent Listing Agent Property Address Town List Price 
Co-Broke Sandra McNeil 8709 Champion Hills Drive Wilmington $519,900
Co-Broke Melissa Lester 3516 Kirby Smith Drive Wilmington $250,000
Jane Marr Co-Broke 404 S 17th Street Wilmington $159,000
Co-Broke Vance Young 22220 Moreland Drive Wilmington $1,199,000
Co-Broke Hugh MacRae 1600 Sturdivant Drive #3 Wilmington $169,500
Jeff Hovis Co-Broke 1413 Castle Hayne Road Wilmington $138,600
Co-Broke Paula Perkins 804 Winged Foot Lane Wilmington $329,900
Vance Young Co-Broke 6713 Hardscrabble Court Wilmington $570,000
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 1410 Kellum Court Wilmington $179,900
Jane  Dodd Co-Broke 5014 Helms Port Avenue Wilmington $580,160
Lois Potratz Michelle Clark 1306 Portside Lane Wilmington $325,000
Pam Kersting Vance Young 7921 Bonaventure Drive Wilmington $529,000
Ashley Garner Kathy Foster 5464 Efird Road Wilmington $395,000
Co-Broke Ashley Garner 1115 Swordfish Lane Wilmington $89,900
Co-Broke Bob McCorkle 314 St Kitts Way Winnabow $155,000
Brigitte Simone Argie Franck 4605 McClelland Drive #B202 Wilmington $72,500
Keith Beatty Co-Broke 1608 Willoughby  Park Court #4 Wilmington $129,900
Co-Broke Alicia Devereaux 217 N Fort  Fisher Blvd #A Kure Beach $449,000
Bobby Brandon Co-Broke 2108 Anson Drive Wilmington $365,000
Ashley Garner Co-Broke 402 Windemere Road Wilmington $209,900
Keith Beatty Co-Broke 15 B Arjean Drive/137 Spring Creek Lane Wilmington $338,385
Co-Broke Robbie Robinson 585 Ella Circle SE Bolivia $2,700
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 550 Tanbridge Road Wilmington $524,900
Co-Broke Deb Hays 4135 Lark Bunting Court SE Southport $299,900
Keith Beatty Susan Lacy 309 Motts Forest Road Wilmington $349,000
Co-Broke Terri Shindel 805 S 2nd Street #1 Carolina Beach $269,000
Co-Broke Amy Brown 4211 Park Avenue Wilmington $229,000
Joseph Dalton Co-Broke 359 Belvedere Drive Holly Ridge $284,068
Jane Dodd Co-Broke 339 Virginia Avenue Wilmington $131,000
Deb Hays Co-Broke 3312 Bougainville Way Wilmington $347,500
Buzzy Northen Buzzy Northen 6507 Yellow Bell Road Wilmington $174,900
Co-Broke Keith Beatty 359 Mallard Bay Road Wilmington $399,900
Michelle Clark Co-Broke 2101 Ainsdale Drive Wilmington $549,000
Keith Beatty Co-Broke 1425 Robinhood Road Wilmington $149,500
Nan Weiss Co-Broke 3625 Hydrangea Court Leland $379,000
Brenda Mitwol Co-Broke 232 Morning View Way Leland $288,600
Lois Potratz Co-Broke 715 Antler Drive Wilmington $339,900
Nan Weiss Co-Broke 8683 Orchard Loop Road NE Leland $141,000
Lois Dixon Lois Dixon 8408 Market Street Wilmington $76,123
Lois Dixon Lois Dixon 8410 Market Street Wilmington $155,513
Carla Lewis Carla Lewis 2047 Odyssey Drive Wilmington $615,000
Tanya Wildman Co-Broke 1920 Ann Street Wilmington $149,900
Sandy Ledbetter Co-Broke 606 N Anderson Blvd Topsail Beach $129,000
Grace Schroeder Johnny Gaddy 31 W Ocean Isle West Blvd Ocean Isle Beach $199,000